Showing posts with label multiculturalism. Show all posts
Showing posts with label multiculturalism. Show all posts

Monday, October 5, 2015

The Salem Award for Human Rights and Social Justice

Good news!  Nominations are open for the Salem Award.  This is a wonderful opportunity to provide recognition for an organization or individual doing good work to promote social justice and human rights locally, nationally or internationally.

As many of you know, I am a  board member of the Salem Award Foundation, a volunteer-run organization that educates and advocates for human rights and social justice as a way of memorializing the witch hysteria of Salem, MA in 1692.  The organization also serves as a steward for the Witch Trial memorial installation, a really beautiful site that is often over-shadowed by the tourist sham-tasticness of Salem.

the memorial space

For the past twenty- four years, the Salem Award has been awarded to individuals and organizations as a way of honoring the individuals in Salem circa 1692 who spoke up and pointed out the injustices and ludicrousness associated with the witch hysteria.  The organization has also been parter of a larger, city-wide effort to make Salem a city that welcomes and includes everyone.  

Nominations are welcome from the public at large. While the award doesn't always go to a New England-based organization or institution, it usually does, as it is very important that awardees can attend the celebration/award ceremony, which often occurs in early spring. (The organization can't fly folks in from Indonesia, no matter how much we might want to!) Recipients are invited to give a talk on an issue important to their work that relates to the SAF's mission and ongoing educational initiatives.  Turnout is big - it is a great way to get exposure for good work being done. There is also a small, unrestricted cash award to help support the honoree's efforts.  You can find out more about past winners of the award here.

Most important, I can bet you anything that if you take a couple hours to fill out a nomination form for that community organization, youth advocacy group, arts and social justice weekly meet-up, school committee on inclusion or Quaker peace gathering that's been on the go for 60 years, etc. etc. etc., it will mean the world to them.  It will make them feel visible, like their work and their efforts and their ways of loving the world and attempting to make it a place that reflects their values of social justice and openness are seen, heard, valued.  

Appreciated.

In a world filled with silences when it matters to speak and efforts to create change that feel too small to make a difference, nothing could be more important.

Nominate today! Deadline is October 30th.




Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Teaching Serial as Public History


serial
Photo credit: Kate Preissler
I took a risk this semester and dedicated a fairly large chunk of class time to teaching Serial in Intro to Public History.  It was placed in the syllabus as a bridge between a unit on memory, identity and different publics and a unit on settings and tools for public history practice.  I was inspired to do this by my own engagement with the podcast (errrr, obsessive binge listening) and by some great email conversations with Kate Preissler, Digital Projects Manager at the Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield, MA, who wrote a fabulous blog post on Serial and public history for the NCPH blog.

In case you've been under a rock, Serial was a hugely popular podcast that ran for twelve episodes last autumn.  It examined the murder of high school student Hae Min Lee in 1999 in Baltimore and pulled apart the evidence used to successfully convict Lee's ex-boyfriend Adnan Syed -- who pleaded not guilty and maintains his innocence to this day, from his cell in a maximum security prison in Maryland.

I wanted to share my rudimentary class outlines and assignments for others who might be interested in exploring Serial with college students.

Monday, February 24, 2014

Dialogue with Racial Violence - Really?

So, turns out that three first year students from the Ole Miss chapter of the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity were probably responsible for defacing the statue of James Meredith on the Ole Miss campus last weekend.  The chapter's been indefinitely suspended, but not before it voted to expel the students allegedly responsible for tying a noose around the neck of the statue and enrobing it in a flag emblazoned with the Confederate Battle flag.  Their parents must be so proud.